MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"  

FRAME SET PREARATION

INSPECTING A FRAME SET

FRONT FORK INSPECTION

REAR DROPS INSPECTION

STRINGING A FRAME SET

CENTERING THE STAYS

SIMPLE TEST - STRAIGHT

TEST RIDING - STRAIGHT

WORD OF CAUTION!

 

 

 

 

FRAME & FORK - INTRODUCTION

MISTAKE UPON MISTAKE UPON MISTAKE

The first vintage road bicycle that I ever attempted to build up was a mid seventies, mid level Sekine SHC 270.  After spending a complete winter fully rebuilding the bicycle, I discovered on the very first ride that the frame and/or fork set was bent.  Bent so badly that the bicycle pulled violently to the right whenever I tried to relax my grip on the handlebars.  Not only that, but the bicycle was way too big for me to ride with an acceptable degree of safety.  The entire building effort might have been a waste of time and money, if I had not learned what to look for when determining frame and fork structural and geometric integrity.

Though, I hate to admit it, I did not learn how to fit a bicycle to me, at this time.  In fact, for years I rode vintage bicycles that were too big for me, and I didn't even know it.  Perhaps, I can help others avoid making these incredibly fundamental mistakes, when selecting a vintage ride for themselves.

NOT MANY STRAIGHT FRAME SETS OUT THERE

Most vintage road bicycles are, for the most part, fairly flimsy structures.  Couple that characteristic with the incredibly rough treatment that the average bicycle suffered during its thirty or forty year lifespan, and you will come to understand why so few vintage frame sets are still straight.  Though I never used to do it, I now check virtually every frame set that I intend to use for myself or sell to others.

Since most frames are not quite perfect, I do not mind effecting a bit of minor repair.  I do draw the limit with repairs, if I feel that the frame damage will, in any way, impact the rider's safety when using the frame set.  This is always a judgment call, based on my experience with literally hundreds of vintage road bicycles.  To that, I add my metal working experience, gleaned during thirty or so years of working as a professional Industrial Mechanic.  I know what I am doing, when it comes to most forms of metal working and, more importantly, I know when NOT to do it.

I do not suggest that anyone attempt to correct frame disorders, unless you are trained to do so.  If your evaluation of the frame set's integrity is off, and/or your repair is inadequate, then you and the bicycle will likely crash!  If, however, you do want to learn how to restore vintage road bicycles, you might want to take the time to develop a level of expertise in this area.  If nothing else, at least learn how to determine is a frame set is straight or not.

NEXT - INSPECTING A FRAME SET

 

 

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

mail@mytenspeeds.com

COPYRIGHT(2008): mytenspeeds.com