MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"  

ART WORK - INTRO

REPLACING ART WORK

RECORDING ORIGINAL ART

ACQUIRING BICYCLE ART

HOME-MADE BICYCLE ART

CREATING BICYCLE ART 

CREATING VINTAGE ROAD BICYCLE ART

-  under construction  -

Do not make the mistake that I did the first time I created and installed my own bicycle art work.  Ensure that you know exactly what art you want to add to the bicycle and exactly where it should be added.  On my early eighties top of the line Cambio Rino 2000 I made the seat tube sticker too long.  Once installed, the bottom of the decal, the part that said "Made in Canada" ended up under the front derailleur clamp.  A small issue, to say the least, but one that means I have to paint the frame set again and until I do the tubing sticker I have for the bicycle will remain uninstalled.  I do not want to waste what is probably going to be a hard to replace art if I don't have to.

In addition to style and color, you also need to know how big to make any fonts that will appear in the image.  There might be some rule of thumb defining size and location, though I am really not sure.  That said, I now try to understand what will create the best image and that seems to depend on balance.  Balance in presentation of color and size as well as balance in where the art is located on each tube.  Of course, location decisions are a non-issue when working from decent art to begin with.  Just take and record a bunch of measurements and your set.  But if there is no way to determine original location, then you will have to rely on appearance to get the art in just the right place.  And this is where the measure twice - cut once procedure comes into place.  Measure twice and cut once?  In the decal makers world this means experiment with different test decals, of differing sizes/designs and in as many locations needed, until the right combination presents itself.  I should add that this can be both interesting and frustrating the same time.  You'll see!

When creating my own bicycle specific art I can go with two routes.  Copy or invent.  In the case of the CCM Tour du Canada, invention will be the process of the day.  I begin inventing by figuring how big each piece of art should be.  And big has two numbers to consider - length and width.  Length is, of course, a non-issue but what about width and height?  Width comes into play if a decal is to go around the tube, hence width will actually be the measured outside diameter of the tube in question.  And height, frequently determined by font size, is very important from an aesthetics point of view.

Basic size and location possibilities defined, pick your computer program and design away.  The bicycle specific art for the "TdC" was created in Microsoft Office Word, believe it or not.  I have a couple of high end graphic programs to work with but for test based stuff, Word does just about everything I need.

The first thing you need to do is design the overall look and this means that your decals will be printed on a single sheet of paper and then temporarily installed on the frame set.  When it comes time to actually transfer art to the frame, one decal at a time will be applied and then on to the next.  Trying to apply a really large decal or sticker is a risk filled task.  It is easy to make a mistake and wreck the decal, not to mention possibly marring the freshly painted frame set.

 

 

 

 

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