MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

MY "TEN SPEEDS"  

ART WORK - INTRO

REPLACING ART WORK

RECORDING ORIGINAL ART

ACQUIRING BICYCLE ART

HOME-MADE BICYCLE ART

CREATING BICYCLE ART 

REPLACING ORIGINAL ART WORK

One of two situations will present themselves when it comes time to figure out what the vintage road bicycle's art work looked like.  Either you have something to work from or you don't.  And, as often as not, the something you have to work with might not even be complete or good enough to allow for full and accurate reproduction.

If the bicycle arrived with absolutely no art work or repainted, then the builder must resort to research to determine what the bicycle's original cosmetics looked like.  Often times this is not the most difficult thing to do since many of the more popular vintage road bicycles are now documented, in one form or another, on the Internet.  However, for the lesser known vintage lightweight steeds, little information if any will present itself readily.

From time to time, original vintage decals, transfers or stickers are offered for auction on Ebay or through other on-line sources.  And it is great when this happens.  But be careful.  Vintage decals and transfers are old, hence the word vintage.  If age can absolutely destroy hoods, tires and some plastics, so too can it alter the nature of old art rendering it useless, in the structural sense.

Fortunately, after market art work is becoming increasingly available through on-line sources, many of which are represented on Ebay.  The new art, assuming that it was well copied from an original image, is just as good looking, more durable and more forgiving to install.  Additionally, if something does go wrong during installation, the big deal is bucks related only.  Replacement is only a PayPal payment and short wait away.  But if an original set is damaged during installation, the farm is purchased and one must once again seek appropriate art.

Then, if working with an unusual or rare bicycle such as this old Velo Solex Saint Tropaz, aftermarket art will be all but non-existent.  To make matters worse, any information pertaining to the rare bicycle might be near impossible to find.  And, if there is absolutely no original art left on the bicycle to begin with, as was the case with my mid eighties Gardin Team Issue, accurate reproduction becomes an impossible dream, unless one can find an identical bicycle, and copy from there.  This was the case with my Peugeot PX10.  Not one shred of art remained, but I researched the bike, found examples of the art, and then just bought what I needed.  Lucky it was available.

So the possible situations that a bicycle restoration project must face is - no art to work with - some art to work with - good art to work with.  The next set of possibilities suggests that the builder will either have to find original or reproduction art.  That failing, any art work to adorn the bicycle will have to be home made.  And don't despair, making decals is not all that difficult.  Making really good ones, however, is a bit more skill and resource demanding.

With this understanding of possible hurdles and potential options, it is time to carefully record the art that you already have to work with.  Unless, of course, your bicycle is a repaint or completely stripped of paint, as was the case with my 1958 Carlton Flyer.  All that said, it matters not where you begin as long as you record what ever you have.  And your record will include good clear pictures, measurements of locations for each decal and measurements of each decal.  Armed with that sort of documented information, the paint job and art replacement can begin.

NEXT - RECORDING ART WORK

 

 

 

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