MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

APOLLO CS - INTRO

FINDING THE APOLLO CS

BUILDING THE APOLLO CS

 

BUILDING THE APOLLO CUSTOM SPORT

The first Apollo Custom Sport to enter The Old Shed was stripped to a bare frame and the components used on another project or sold to off.  Why was so little attention paid to the first CS?  The cosmetics were nothing special and Glen, the former owner, had drilled the alloy rims to accept Schrader valve stems.  The frame set, however, still hangs from the rafters in The Old Shed.  Perhaps it would make a good Poor Boy Single Speed - hmmm.

The second Custom Sport arrived in my back yard and in my absence.  This sounds silly, but it is the truth.  I had been away on a vacation, of sorts, returning home to discover the second Apollo leaning against the apple tree, patiently awaiting my return.  Had it not been for its filthy state, I am sure the bicycle would have managed to find its way elsewhere without my even seeing it.  Anyway...

As mentioned, the bike was filthy!  And very small, the seat tube measuring 48cm (c-c).  Again, interest was not what it would have been had the bike been between 54 and 56 centimetres.  None the less, the bike proved to be almost mint, under its filthy disguise.  The bicycle was offered on Ebay and sold for a third of what I would have considered it value to be.  Ya wins some and ya...

The third Apollo Custom Sport, again the standard white with blue head tube, surfaced.  And, once again, the bike was filthy.  To add insult to injury, the bike was plagued with a mechanical issue or two.  But the bike was my size and I do like the looks.  The question is, how does it ride?  To answer that, I had to clean and repair the bicycle.

A bicycle, particularly one that is absolutely filthy, should be disassembled to get it clean.  Most disassembly can be completed with standard tools, but some chores will require bicycle specific tools.  The crank set, for example, cannot be safely removed without a crank puller.  Even the bottom bracket will require special tools.  But for the purpose of a test build, a few of the fundamental home tools will prove adequate.

Begin inspection by removing any old, seized and/or badly worn cables.  Loosen the seat post clamp bolt as well as the steering stem.  Remove both, but the stem and handlebar assembly can be left attached by its cables.  Be careful to not allow the handlebar assembly to hit, and perhaps dent, the bicycle's tubing.  Be really careful!

It is possible that either the seat post or stem is stuck.  Fixing either situation can be a daunting task.  But fix you must if you ever hope to properly ride, fit and maintain your bicycle.

With the stem and post removed, turn your attention to the wheels.  Shift the rear derailleur to the lowest cog.  Release the brake calliper quick release, if there is one.  Loosen the axle nuts or quick release assembly and drop the wheel out of the frame set.  Turn your attention to the front wheel and remove it also.  Now, complete a quick inspection of the wheels.

A really poor wheel set can spell the end of a build for many people.  Simply put, a decent set of vintage wheels might prove to be a costly item.  At any rate, it is a good idea to at least give the wheels a good looking over.  Are they true?  Are the rims dented or do they have any flat spots?  Do the axles rotate freely or do they feel dirty and rough?  Are the tires worn, flat and/or rotted?  And, finally, do they match?

Do the wheels match is a big question.  Mismatched wheels might well suggest a crash in the bicycle's past.  A non original front wheel is something that should raise red flags and encourage a much closer inspection of frame and fork set integrity.

During the initial wheel inspection, it is also a good idea to see if the spoke nipples are free to move.  Seized nipples will prevent wheel maintenance, making it impossible to true or dish the wheels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

mail@mytenspeeds.com

COPYRIGHT(2008): mytenspeeds.com