MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

ALAN SR - INTRO

FINDING THE ALAN SR

BUILDING THE ALAN SR

RIDING THE ALAN SR 

 

BICYCLES OF ITALY

BUILDING THE ALAN SUPER RECORD

The first order of business with the ALAN was to measure the frame set up, with intent of satisfying myself that it had not been severely damaged during its ordeal of being stolen and then run through a multi year legal procedure, finally resulting in the bicycle being, unceremoniously dumped in a field in North-western Ontario.

But the frame set measured true and everything look just fine, sort of.  Actually, the "as found" ALAN could not be ridden "as found".  With that in mind, I set to the task of deciding which way I would want to go with the build.

Even though the ALAN showed up with a partial Campagnolo Record grouppo installed, I did not want to go Campy with the bicycle.  Rather, I wanted to select components that would compliment the bicycle's appearance.

The first thing that one notices, upon close inspection of the ALAN's frame set is the intricate scroll work, etched into the head tube lugs.  These etchings reminded me of the Shimano 600 Arabesque decoration and the decision seemed almost too simple.  Go with the 600 set, and I had several to choose from.

The the head set and bottom bracket were, pretty much, predefined items.  The were in great shape, mechanically and cosmetically, and appeared to be of special issue design.  Wisdom suggested just keeping the ones that came with the bicycle.

Selecting a steering stem and handlebars proved to be another relatively easy set of choices to make.  ALAN Super Record.  Why not an SR embossed steering stem and a set of SR etched handlebars?  Once again, the choice was obvious, even though one would question the rational behind installing Asian components on an Italian machine.

The 25mm seat post was one item that I did not have a spare for.  With that in mind, the original TTT. that came with the bicycle, was cleaned up and put right back where it came from.  Of course, a saddle would be the next thing needed, and out to The Old Shed I went, to see what that dilapidated structure would cough up this time.

Never before had I built up a vintage road bicycle with with final weight consideration to deal with.  I just restored or built what I felt would work well.  Well, the ALAN was a bit different.  It was an under twenty pound steed and I wanted to make sure of that.

After looking though my saddle supply, I found a Selle Italia in excellent condition and it felt as if it was very light.  The saddle was also the correct color, with a tiny exception.  The yellow writing on the back of the saddle was not in keeping with my aesthetic theme.

I wanted the bicycle to be a set of contrasts between black and sliver only.  I did not want any color of any kind to be part of the build.  Well, the mark was not quite met.  The saddle broke the intent, and so to did the rims decals.  And, aside from those two splashes of color, the bicycle is, basically, black and silver.

The transmission selected for the job was the Shimano 600 Arabesque offering, a beautiful set of derailleurs, if there ever was one.  So too are the ornate shift levers, and when new, the background was filled with black paint.  Truly an attractive set of chain jumpers.

One problem did surface regarding setting up the transmission.  The stay mounted cable stop, for the rear derailleur, had been broken off.  Now that would be an incredibly hard item to find!  What to do?

As it turned out, with a bit of thinking, filing and fitting, a clamp on cable stop was modified to work and look not at all out of place.

In keeping with the Shimano 600 theme, a set of side pull, pantographed callipers and matching levers were selected and installed.  With no original brake hoods available, a set of Chang Stars proved to be an adequate and attractive fit.  To that add the comfort factor imparted, and the installation proved to be more than worth while.

The callipers, themselves, are also works of vintage Velo art, in my opinion.  Heavily pantographed, they proudly bear their name and model.  And, though not state of the art stoppers, they do a more than adequate job of slowing the bicycle down.

By the time the bicycle was built up, it weighed in at 19 pounds and 10 ounces, the lightest bicycle in my collection, at the time.  And one of only three, out of hundreds, that comes in under the twenty pound mark.

NEXT - RIDING THE ALAN SUPER RECORD

 

 

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