MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

196? PEUGEOT PX10 - INTRO

FINDING THE PEUGEOT PX10

PX10 FRAME SET REPAIR

PX10 TEST BUILDING

PX10 TEST RIDING

RESTORING THE PX10

STREET RESTORED PX10

RESTORED PX10 - ALMOST

 

BICYCLES OF FRANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINALLY - THE RESTORED PEUGEOT PX10

It is January 6, 2009 and the PX10 sits beside my computer desk at the time of this writing, waiting for one pedal and the transmission cables to be installed.  The bicycle is pretty much complete and ready to ride but I will not ride it for a few months since Thunder Bay presently winters its way through the cold months under a three foot deep blanket of snow.  Snow rutted roadways are narrowed by the snow piled high along the sides of every road.  Temperatures fluctuate from pretty cold to really cold, and riding in minus twenty or thirty degree weather is not much fun, no matter how well one dresses.  However, I will pick a really nice day next Spring to take the Peugeot out for what might be called its maiden ride, even though I have ridden the bicycle as fitted several times already.

Though I had hoped to have the bicycle's restoration completed before the snow arrived, I failed.  Winter came early to Thunder Bay, squashing all hopes of rapid completion.  With that in mind, I puttered with the bicycle when I had time to do so or when I felt the need for something relaxing to do.  I decided to complete a bicycle over the Christmas holiday season and that is exactly what I did.

         

I look at the PX10 as it now sits and I am impressed with the results, even though the bicycle is far from period correct when components are the issue.  And as I look over the results of my effort, my thoughts turn to how much the restoration set me back in dollars and cents. Admittedly. I can complete a Street Restoration for less than the average gal or guy.  I have an Old Shed full of correct or near correct components to use and that alone will help to trim a considerable amount off of the cost of the finished product.  That said...

       

The Peugeot set me back less than two hundred dollars the way it sits now, fully Street Restored and ready to ride.  Remember, Street Restored is considerably different from Restored.  Restored means accurate cosmetics and mechanics brought back to original specifications.  Street Restored means build the bicycle as close to original as your skill level and resources will permit.  Had I sought out all of the original period and model components, the price would have been closer to five hundred bucks and I am probably being conservative in that estimate.

             

However, a Street Restored bicycle does not have to be letter perfect, cosmetically or mechanically.  The components do not all have to be period or model correct to get the bicycle on the road.  The average builder can usually make do with this, that or the other thing, until just the right item comes along at an affordable price as was the case with the Old School Simplex skewers that came my way quite by fluke half way into the PX10  project.  And the skewer cost was nothing.  This sort of thing happens frequently and, quite frankly, adds a bit of fun to the build.  It is a treat when just the right component shows up for little or even no cash outlay.  And following that philosophy, the 1963 PX10 is Street Restored until the last original component is found and installed.

         

       

And the list of components required to complete the Peugeot is worth summarizing.  Normandy "Competition" hubs lead the list, followed by a period and model correct Simplex transmission.  The transmission will probably never become part of the build since the derailleurs required are old, rare and very costly to purchase.  To that add the need for period and model correct shifters, another item that will likely prove hard to come by.  Though I hope that the cranks set will function as it is supposed to, chances are I will have to find a correct and mechanically sound left arm since the taper of the one mounted might have been stretched too much to be of use.

Other component concerns include the derailleur cable bracket mounted near the bottom bracket.  Do I have the correct model and vintage?  I am not sure at this point in time but the unit mounted looks just fine, does the job nicely and only experts will know the difference.

The Dural Forged Mafac brakes are correct for the bicycle as nearly as I can tell.  Though a bit grungy as found, the levers and callipers polished up very nicely and will probably remain as a permanent fitting to the bicycle.  Part of the brake set's charm lies in the brackets needed to complete function.  The top tube brake cable clamps are Simplex but the front and rear cable guides are original and correct Mafac offerings.  The brakes have a definite vintage look and suit the bicycle perfectly.

The pedals selected, Lyotard platforms with simple clips and straps look correct and will work well enough even though I do prefer to use clipless pedals on my regular rides.  That said, the PX10 will never be a regular ride.  Though I do insist that all of my bicycles are road worthy, I do not plan to ride the Peugeot all that much.  The question, of course, is why not?

Simply put, the Peugeot is old and the general rule of thumb is the older a bicycle is the less "user friendly" it becomes.  The decision to use Old School pedals with clips and straps is a perfect example of poor "user friendliness".  The pedals will work just fine and the "Rat Traps" will help with spinning but the safety factor will be horribly compromised.  Pedal efficiency will also be compromised.  However, the look and feel of the bicycle will be retained.  The trade-off in this instance is justified in my mind since I want to feel the ride, as offered,  back in the sixties.  Of course, it is entirely possible that the ride will be so satisfying that the PX10 might see more road time than I presently anticipate.

           

What's next for my 1963 Peugeot PX10?  Display!  I will hang the bicycle on the wall and there it will wait until next Spring.  I will choose a special day, filled with warm sun, a blue sky and the promise of a memorable ride.  I will ride through the city and then onto one of the little used secondary highways that weave through the Canadian Shield that makes North Western Ontario, Canada such a special place.  And I will take a few pictures to show you what the day and ride looked like.

 

 

 

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