MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

196? PEUGEOT PX10 - INTRO

FINDING THE PEUGEOT PX10

PX10 FRAME SET REPAIR

PX10 TEST BUILDING

PX10 TEST RIDING

RESTORING THE PX10

STREET RESTORED PX10

RESTORED PX10 - ALMOST

 

BICYCLES OF FRANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPAIRING THE PEUGEOT PX10 FRAME SET

The local bicycle shops are very good to me, often times offering discounts on items purchased.  A couple of the shop owners even allow me use of their work shops and speciality tools.  With this in mind, I approached a good friend and local bike shop owner about taking a shot at straightening the Peugeot's frame set.  He was more than happy to allow me access to the shop and his frame repair tools.  He was also interested in witnessing the process and even help out, should the opportunity present itself.  With that in mind, I stripped the PX10 frame set of all components and nasty debris, including bottom bracket and head set grease.  Since I would be riding, I slung the frame over my shoulder and, with the forks sticking out of my back pack, headed off to the bike shop.

The first thing I did was install the frame straightening tool.  While doing so I discussed the process with Peter, the shop owner.  He has been a rider for many years but his expertise when it comes to straightening vintage road bicycles frame sets is about as limited as my own.  Anyway, I had decided that I had nothing to lose by trying to repair the Peugeot.  As it stood, the frame set was pretty much useless and taking up badly needed storage space in The Old Shed.

I took one look at the tool used to straighten bent down and top tubes and shuddered at the thought of the kind of pressures that I was about to subject this flimsy old road bicycle frame set to.  I would actually be bracing the tool against the bottom bracket housing and then, using a power thread turnbuckle affair, would push the top and down tubes back into position at the same time.  To be honest, at this point in time I was not filled with confidence.  If fact, I was filled with trepidation.  Would I end up destroying the frame set all together?

As I studied the set-up, I realized that it would be a good idea to install the bottom bracket cups to reduce the possibility of distorting the bottom bracket housing.  I jumped on my bike, zoomed home, grabbed the cups and returned to the bike shop.

Once the cups were finger tight installed into the bottom bracket, I set the frame straightening tool up for a second time.  Twisting the turn buckle, I applied just enough pressure to secure the assembly.  I did not want to start actually bending anything until I had a reasonable idea of where I started at.  I should add that I had anticipated the need to define a starting point and with this in mind I had already checked the alignment of the rear drops in relation to each other and to the centerline of the frame set itself.  Interestingly enough, the rear drops and stays were in near perfect alignment "as found".

Before bending actually began, I ran my frame trueness guide, which is nothing more than a piece of string up and around the top of the head tube.  I then measured the distance from each side of the seat tube to the appropriate string.  The measurements were pretty much the same.  I then moved the string to the bottom of the shaft that had been inserted through the head tube.  I measured the difference from seat tube to string again.  This all told me one thing - the head tube would have to be first pushed forward and then twisted a wee bit to the right achieve proper alignment.

I also made a mark on the bottom bracket and a second mark on the shaft that had been inserted into the bicycle's head tube.  I estimated where the front drops would have been and made the mark there.  This done, I measured and recorded the distance from the bottom bracket to the shaft mark.  I would use this mark to determine how much I was actually moving the shaft with each push.  I am not sure if this did any real good but at least I had a starting point to measure progress from.  As it turned out, the idea proved to be quite useful.

With everything set-up and starting point determined, I began the process of turning the turnbuckle.  The shaft moved.  I stopped, measured the distance between marks, relaxed the pressure slightly and measured again.  There had been no change in distance from the original measurement.  I repeated this process a second time but with more pressure.

With each application of pressure, I studied the appearance of the bends in the top and down tubes.  Nothing seemed to be happening at first but things did begin to change with each pass at straightening the frame.  I worked in very small increments with the hope of avoiding the "oops, I went to far syndrome".  I repeated the entire process about twenty times until I figured that I had gone far enough.

I should add that the "I've gone as far as I should thing" was more of a feeling than a science.  Based on my original bottom bracket to shaft marks, I had increased the distance by nearly an inch.  Time to stop.  Based on my observations of the top and down tube shape change, it was time to stop.  Time to go home and assemble the PX10 for a test ride.  Time to see if I had succeeded in resurrecting a badly damaged vintage road bicycle frame set.

NEXT - TEST BUILDING THE PEUGEOT PX10

 

 

 

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