MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

196? PEUGEOT PX10 - INTRO

FINDING THE PEUGEOT PX10

PX10 FRAME SET REPAIR

PX10 TEST BUILDING

PX10 TEST RIDING

RESTORING THE PX10

STREET RESTORED PX10

RESTORED PX10 - ALMOST

 

BICYCLES OF FRANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINDING THE PEUGEOT PX10

 

The story surrounding the acquisition of the PX10 is bitter sweet, to say the least.  It is one of those bicycles that I discovered on-line and purchased, for lack of a better word, unseen and untested.

An email, from an on-line friend, showed up in my in-box one day offering something that the sender was sure I would be interested in.  My on-line friend lives in the US and is aware of my interest in finding a Peugeot PX10.  His email indicated that he had stumbled across one and that it was too big for him to ride.  He wanted to let me know that it was available and also expressed interest in what I had in The Old Shed that might be of interest to him.

With my interest captured, emails began to pass back and forth between my southern friend and myself.  Pictures were exchanged and a deal was struck.  He would send me the PX10 in exchange for a very clean old English Glider that I had tucked away in The Old Shed.  I should add that the Glider was tucked away for a reason.  I was planning on using the beautiful leather saddle and very old brake set for an early fifties CCM that I had recently purchased from a friend in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada's most western province.

As I recall, the Peugeot took a while to reach me, for a variety reasons, but it finally showed up near the end of the month in mid winter and the day before I was to leave for my winter's ride in Jamaica.  Each year I spend a month riding my Giant full suspension mountain bicycle around the back roads of the island.  And what great rides I have.  But, I digress...

Just before noon hour a call came in that the bicycle had arrived from the west coast and I zoomed away to pick the PX10 up.  I was stunned at how much duty and tax I had to pay for the bike but coughed up the money none the less.  With the boxed bike in the back of the Ranger, I headed for home exercising caution driving since the road conditions in Thunder Bay in mid winter can be and usually are quite hazardous.

Upon arriving home, I all but tore into the shipping container and pulled the disassembled bicycle from its confines.  I was impressed with the packing job and happy that my friend had gone to so much trouble to protect this old and hard to find road bike.

I took about ten seconds for my joy to turn to dismay as I pulled the frame set from the box.  The top tube and down tube were both bent!  Disappointment rained supreme for a moment and I quickly pulled the remaining components from the box.  The mismatched and modified components were not much better than the frame set.  My despair deepened as I set about the task of assembling the bicycle.  Though I though that I had little hope of ever building the bike, I at least wanted to keep it all together.  And I am glad that I did...

With the bike loosely assembled, it was even more obvious that there was a serious frame set issue.  The front wheel, once installed in the forks, nearly touched the down tube and the wheel sat off to one side of the fork blades.  Not only was the frame set damaged but so too were the front forks.  Joy had turned to disappointment and then disgust.  I hung the bicycle up in The Old Shed walked away with little hope of building the bike.

There was no time to deal with the Peugeot since I was off to the islands the next day.  I pretty much wanted to put the bicycle, and surrounding disappointment, out of my mind until I returned from my winter's journey.  Though it grieves me to mention it, I did not even let my friend know of the problem right away.  I felt the problem would be best addressed when I returned, in a month's time.  And that is how my relationship with my 1963 PX10 began.

Thoughts of the Peugeot, and the damage that it had experienced, plagued me from time to time as I enjoyed the rides and imbibes that Jamaica had to offer.  I pretty much thought, at the time, that the project was a bust.  Though I had straightened several frame sets before, I had always worked only on minor problems usually associated with the rear drops or stays.  These are fairly easy to situation to deal with.  But bent main tubes are a whole different story.  So too are bent front forks.  But some bicycles are worth the extra effort when restoration is the goal, and for me a Peugeot PX10 in my size is worth that effort though I was not quite so positive at the time.

The PX10 remained in The Old Shed even after I had returned from the islands.  All interest in building the bicycle were gone for the time being.  I had lots going on at the time and even more planned with the onset of Spring's approach.  Spring is always busy with people's interest turning to the season that best supports the bicyclist's interest.  With that in mind, I paid the PX10 no mind for the next two or three months.

But a PX10 is a worthy project.  I had spent quite a bit of time researching the bicycle and the 1963 vintage is considered by many collectors to be the first true PX10 model.  With that information, coupled with my keen interest in building and riding a vintage Peugeot PX10, I decided to have a go at straightening the frame and fork sets out.

NEXT - REPAIRING THE PX10 FRAME SET

 

 

 

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