MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

SEKINE SHC270 "SS" - INTRO

FINDING THE SEKINE "SS"

BUILDING THE SEKINE "SS"

RIDING THE SEKINE "SS"

 

BICYCLES OF CANADA

 

  

BUILDING THE SEKINE SHC270 SS

To describe, in detail, how I converted the Sekine to "Single Speed" design would be an exercise in redundancy.  Near complete instructions, are available here, in the Single Speed Conversion feature article.  Building this Sekine followed much the same set of procedures described .

The conversion process began in mid winter.  I was working in the smallest of workshops, which was little more than a corner of the laundry room.  At the beginning of the build, it was my intention to document everything, with my digital camera.  Though I did document much of the process, the documentation was incomplete and could not stand alone for a feature article on how to build a Single Speed bicycle.

With that I mind, I donned my winter riding gear and took the Sekine SHC270, "as found", out for a test ride.  I should add that, I had already checked the bicycle over, to ensure that it was, indeed, safe to ride.  I have missed this step, on previous test rides, and regretted doing so, as was the case with my early eighties Olmo Grand Prix.  With the test ride out of the way, and reasonably satisfied that the frame and fork sets were structurally sound, I set about stripping the bicycle to its bare frame.

With the frame stripped of all components, I measured this and that, in an effort to double check, that the frame's geometry had not been compromised.  Measurement results concurred, with the quality of the ride, indicating that nothing was bent or broken.

The decision to discard the transmission, is a given, in a "Single Speed" conversion.  But what other weight adding, and vision distracting, items could be removed?  Though I like the Sekine rear wheel spoke protector (pie plate), it is heavy and bulky looking.  With that in mind, I decided to not include that piece in the build, even though I have a few near mint ones hanging in The Old Shed.

A quick inspection of the crank and ring set, suggested that an alternate needed to be located.  The "as found" set would be a bit more difficult to convert to single speed design, but it could be done.  I did, however, want something with just a touch more character.  With that in mind, a quick search through The Old Shed, produced just the set.  An hour invested, would result in a pretty decent looking and functioning converted "Single Speed", crank and ring set.

And, other choices had been apparent, even before I started the conversion.  I had toyed with the idea of using moustache handlebars, knowing they would add vintage appeal and offer a more upright riding position.  However, I like and finally decided to go with the more conventional drop bars.  Choosing drop bars presented a brake lever style choice.  I could go with a non-aero lever style, allowing cables to exit the top of the levers or, go with the Aero Lever and route cables under the handlebar tape.

One of the things I like about the "Single Speed" bicycle, is the appearance of lightness.  The uncluttered look, might be a better way of putting it.  With that in mind, I decided to go with the Aero brake lever and keep the cables as, out of sight, as possible.  Fortunately, a set of Aero levers had been sitting around, in the workshop, for some time, begging for a place to call home.  And, it just so happened, that the levers would fit in perfectly, with this "Single Speed" conversion.  The levers were very plain, bearing no markings or adornments what so ever, other than the Lee Chee emblem embossed on the hoods.  Clean and uncluttered, just what I was looking for.

About the only choice, I had left to make, would be which saddle to install.  Remember, the Sekine was to be my around town errand runner.  I did not want to invest a whole bunch of cash in the bike.  To that, add that the bicycle would see its fair share of inclement weather, which can best be described as rain.  And, the last thing I would want to do would be ride a favourite saddle in the rain.  With all of those things in mind, I selected the slightly scuffed up, leather covered saddle, that I had kicking around at the time.  Chances are that the saddle would be changed out, once I started riding the bicycle.  Sadly, that opportunity, to do so, never did surface.

NEXT - RIDING THE SEKINE SHT270 SS

 

 

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