MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

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MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

SEKINE SHC270 "SS" - INTRO

FINDING THE SEKINE "SS"

BUILDING THE SEKINE "SS"

RIDING THE SEKINE "SS"

 

BICYCLES OF CANADA

  

FINDING THE SEKINE SHC270 "SS"

At the time of this writing, I must have found, well over, one thousand vintage road bicycles.  Of the thousand found, only a few hundred would prove to be of sufficient collectible value, to warrant dragging home.  But, the number of vintage road bicycles, that have found their way into The Old Shed, is still in excess of five hundred.  With that in mind, there are times that I honestly cannot remember, where a given bicycle, might have come from.

Sure, the Sekine bicycles, that were built in Canada, came from Three Rivers Manitoba.  But, where I found this actual Sekine SHC270, will forever remain a mystery.  What I can say about the bicycle, is that I would have acquired it free, or for very little cash outlay.  And, I do recall deciding to convert the "as found" old "Ten Speed", to "Single Speed" design, with the hope that I might use the build, to help others with similar projects.  That said, I did use a Sekine SHC270 to explain, and demonstrate, Single Speed Conversion, but not the Sekine featured here.

So, even though I can't recall where this old bicycle was found, or how I found it, I can assure you that it was found following the procedures I use when bicycle hunting.

Since how and where I found this bicycle cannot be discussed, perhaps why I selected it for "Single Speed" conversion, would prove to be a more useful topic.

First of all, the Sekine had been hanging in The Old Shed, for some time, and was in excellent condition, both mechanically and cosmetically.  There is little sense, in trying to make a banged, and scratched up, rusted relic into a "Single Speed", unless you want your "SS" to look ugly, for theft prevention purposes.  Don't laugh.  I have, and ride, just such a Poor Boy bicycle, on a regular basis.  And, I have been riding it for years.  Back to the SHC270...

Secondly, the Sekine chosen for conversion, was my size and it was my intention to make this bike my daily ride - for that season.  Again, there is no sense building a bicycle for yourself that does not fit you.

The Sekine was my size, of Canadian make, and in great shape.  And, it just so happens that I like the antiquated appearance of these old Sekine bicycles.  To that, add the fact that the bicycle did not owe me anything.  Though it was a nice bike, I would be using it, on a regular basis, and leaving it, unattended, for short periods of time.  Theft potential would present itself, through doing so.  If the bike did get ripped off, I would not be loosing all that much, in dollars and cents, sense.

Of course, there are bicycle specific characteristics, that one must look for, when deciding to convert an old road bicycle, to "Single Speed" design.  Rear drop style is important and the Sekine had the perfect rear drops for conversion - long horizontal drops, without an integral derailleur hanger.  Though the horizontal drop does not appear to be exactly horizontal, they do, none the less, allow for a considerable range of fore/aft adjustment.  Adjustment, necessary, to allow for proper drive chain installation and tuning.

Being from the mid seventies, the Sekine also sported a near complete absence of braze-ons.  Braze-ons, those for the down tube shifters, in particular, detract from the clean appearance of a "Single Speed".  The Sekine was free of these aesthetically disrupting features.

Perhaps the most image damaging braze-on, when Single Speed conversion is the issue, are the down tube shifter mounts.  These unsightly braze-ons, located on either side of the vintage down tube, stick out, on a "Single Speed", like a couple of sore thumbs.  Little can be done to hide, or disguise, these no longer useful frame features.  About the best disguise, found to date, is simply a plastic inner tube valve cap, forced over the unsightly mount as is shown on this Bianchi Single Speed.  Fortunately, the Sekine was free of the aesthetically displeasing features.

Next, on the braze-on list of don't wants for a "Single Speed" build, are the derailleur guides.  In days gone by, derailleur cable guides would have been attached to the top of the bottom bracket, as was the case on the first "Single Speed" I built, a mid seventies Falcon.  Later model road bikes, would see these guides mounted underneath the bottom bracket, in days to come.  But for an old "Ten Speed", converted to "Single Speed" design, these derailleur guides are ugly, pure and simple.  Additionally, their presence makes it just about impossible to get the area clean and debris free.  Finally, those stupid guides WILL wear out, sooner or later.  And once sufficiently worn, they will snag the front derailleur cable and prevent the derailleur from downshifting.  Fortunately, the Sekine came fitted with a clamp on cable guide which, once removed, left a clean and uncluttered bottom bracket housing.

Sadly, the Sekine sported a single braze-on.  Though small, when compared to other braze-on features, the chain stay transmission cable guide sticks right out there, in the open, distracting from the clean appearance of the "SS" converted rear end.  Not the biggest deal in the world, but the bike would have been just a touch nicer, without the chain stay braze-on.

And, those are the reasons for choosing the Sekine for "Single Speed" conversion.  My size.  Good shape.  Absence of braze-ons.  Long horizontal rear drops.  And, I just happened to have one sitting, doing nothing, in The Old Shed.

NEXT - BUILDING THE SEKINE SHC270 "SS"

 

 

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