MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

 

SITE INDEX   FINDING   BICYCLES   WORK SHOP   TRADING   WHAT'S NEW?

MY "TEN SPEEDS"

 

 

MARINONI SQUADRA - INTRO

FINDING THE SQUADRA

BUILDING THE SQUADRA

RIDING THE SQUADRA

 

BICYCLES OF CANADA

 

FINDING THE 2000 MARINONI SQUADRA

The first time I laid eyes on the Squadra, the bicycle was priced at $1,600.00.  Not only did the bicycle seem to be way over priced, but it was also too big for me.  At least, I thought so the first time and saw it, and several times after that.

One way to find old bikes, is to visit old bicycle stores.  Doing so is a lot of fun, particularly, if you are allowed into the back rooms and, dungeon like, basements.  Several local bike shops, both in Thunder Bay and abroad, allow me access to their Velo archive of parts, bikes and literature.  Well, not much vintage literature, but the array of bikes, frame sets and components can be "Candy Store" like stunning.

Several bikes, including a mid eighties Raleigh touring bike, a gorgeous but cosmetically challenged 1971 Atala Professional, sans wheels, a near mint 1977 Raleigh Competition, a equally clean Raleigh Super Course and a Mikado Cadence immediately come to mind.  I might add that there was only one remarkable deal encountered, and that was for the Atala.  Twenty dollars for the everything, including a mint set of old logo Cinelli track bars, still fitted to my 1976 Marinoni Quebec.

Of all those bikes acquired, from the hidden places of local bike shops, the only one I have left is the Marinoni Squadra.  That bike, somewhat larger than I had been used to riding at the time, is an absolute joy to use.  But it did take a good deal of time to purchase.

Upon first inspection, I determined that at 56cm(c-c measured along the seat tube) was just a tad too big for me to ride comfortably.  I was wrong, but it would take quite some time to better determine so.  Also, I was very sceptical about the fork set fitted to the bicycle.  I doubted that this all steel steed would be fitted with carbon fibre forks.

Though I feel that a 54cm is a better fit, the larger bike allows me to arch my neck less, when riding.  I broke my neck, while riding to work in 2002, and, to this day, had been having increasing neck pain while riding and for hours after.  And, I do mean considerable pain.  A bigger frame would mean less crouch and I would not have to arch my neck as much.  At least that was the theory.

At any rate, and after almost eighteen months, I decided to have a go at purchasing the Marinoni.  I asked the bike shop owner if I could negotiate, one on one,  with the owner, rather than through the shop.  Farzam, after housing the bicycle for almost two years, agreed.  With the owner's name and number in hand, I left the shop, engaged my cell phone and called the previous owner up.

We spoke for a few moments, and I explained my interest in the Marinoni he was trying to sell.  Well, after trying to sell the bicycle for nearly two years, the previous owner was open to offers.  Though I rarely make an offer over the telephone, I did decide to throw caution to the wind, and offered less than half of what the bicycle was originally listed for.  The owner accepted without countering.  I was shocked, expecting to come in at closer to or even over a thousand dollars.

We agreed to meet.  I zoomed over to a bank and withdrew the needed cash.  From there I zipped home, exchanged my ride for that day, my early eighties Tommassini Prestige, for my trusty (not really) Ranger.  At the meeting place, I met Wayne, and wondered quietly, to myself, why such a short man would have purchased such a large bicycle.  Anyway...

Wayne and I chatted briefly.  I paid him for the bike.  He gave me a hand written receipt and that was that.  The Marinoni Squadra was mine.  Well, not quite...

I did have to drive back to the local bike shop to pick up my new/old prize.

NEXT - BUILDING THE 2000 MARINONI SQUADRA

 

 

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